International Journal of Immunology

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Association Between ABO-RHD Blood Groups and COVID-19: A Preliminary Study of 76 Cases

Received: 7 March 2023    Accepted: 6 April 2023    Published: 10 May 2023
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Abstract

Introduction: Blood types are most often incriminated in susceptibility to COVID-19. Blood group O subjects are reportedly less susceptible to COVID-19. However, these reports are mainly from countries with high infection rates. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the association between the risk of COVID-19 infection, its severity, and ABO-RHD blood groups at the Training Hospitals of Bouake and Cocody (Ivory Coast). Material and methods: This was a prospective study that lasted four months. All patients with COVID-19 at the time of the study and followed at the Training Hospitals of Bouake and Cocody, hospitalized in the COVID-19 centers or in home confinement, were included. T lymphocyte subpopulations were counted on the BD FACS Calibur flow cytometer after labeling. ABO and RHD blood typing was performed in all patients. Results: Of the 76 patients collected, 78.9% were homebound, 18.4% in hospital and 2.6% in the ICU. The mean age was 41.92 ± 15.13 years with a male predominance. The majority of hospitalized patients were significantly of blood group A (p=0.020). CD4 and CD8 T lymphopenia were significantly more frequent in patients with blood group A than in those with blood groups B, AB and O. Conclusion: The impact of blood group on the severity of the disease would exist. Our study showed that blood group A subjects were more likely to have COVID-19. In addition, a statistically significant association between blood type A and CD4 and CD8 T lymphopenia was found. These results should be confirmed by studies based on larger patient samples.

DOI 10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11
Published in International Journal of Immunology (Volume 11, Issue 1, March 2023)
Page(s) 1-5
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Lymphopenia, CD4, CD8, COVID-19, ABO-RHD Blood Groups

References
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  • APA Style

    Adou Adjoumanvoule Honore, Siransy Kouabla Liliane, Memel Lasme Roselle Charline, Yeboah Oppong Richard, Goran-Kouacou Amah Patricia, et al. (2023). Association Between ABO-RHD Blood Groups and COVID-19: A Preliminary Study of 76 Cases. International Journal of Immunology, 11(1), 1-5. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11

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    ACS Style

    Adou Adjoumanvoule Honore; Siransy Kouabla Liliane; Memel Lasme Roselle Charline; Yeboah Oppong Richard; Goran-Kouacou Amah Patricia, et al. Association Between ABO-RHD Blood Groups and COVID-19: A Preliminary Study of 76 Cases. Int. J. Immunol. 2023, 11(1), 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11

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    AMA Style

    Adou Adjoumanvoule Honore, Siransy Kouabla Liliane, Memel Lasme Roselle Charline, Yeboah Oppong Richard, Goran-Kouacou Amah Patricia, et al. Association Between ABO-RHD Blood Groups and COVID-19: A Preliminary Study of 76 Cases. Int J Immunol. 2023;11(1):1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11,
      author = {Adou Adjoumanvoule Honore and Siransy Kouabla Liliane and Memel Lasme Roselle Charline and Yeboah Oppong Richard and Goran-Kouacou Amah Patricia and Kone Djakaridja and Kadiane N’Dri Juliette and Assi Aya Ursule Aniela and Gnemagnon Mahi Eric Constant and Ouattara Awa and Oura Brou Doris and Moussa Sali and Koya Hebert Gautier and Seri Yida Jocelyne and Aba Yapo Thomas and Krah Ouffoue},
      title = {Association Between ABO-RHD Blood Groups and COVID-19: A Preliminary Study of 76 Cases},
      journal = {International Journal of Immunology},
      volume = {11},
      number = {1},
      pages = {1-5},
      doi = {10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.iji.20231101.11},
      abstract = {Introduction: Blood types are most often incriminated in susceptibility to COVID-19. Blood group O subjects are reportedly less susceptible to COVID-19. However, these reports are mainly from countries with high infection rates. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the association between the risk of COVID-19 infection, its severity, and ABO-RHD blood groups at the Training Hospitals of Bouake and Cocody (Ivory Coast). Material and methods: This was a prospective study that lasted four months. All patients with COVID-19 at the time of the study and followed at the Training Hospitals of Bouake and Cocody, hospitalized in the COVID-19 centers or in home confinement, were included. T lymphocyte subpopulations were counted on the BD FACS Calibur flow cytometer after labeling. ABO and RHD blood typing was performed in all patients. Results: Of the 76 patients collected, 78.9% were homebound, 18.4% in hospital and 2.6% in the ICU. The mean age was 41.92 ± 15.13 years with a male predominance. The majority of hospitalized patients were significantly of blood group A (p=0.020). CD4 and CD8 T lymphopenia were significantly more frequent in patients with blood group A than in those with blood groups B, AB and O. Conclusion: The impact of blood group on the severity of the disease would exist. Our study showed that blood group A subjects were more likely to have COVID-19. In addition, a statistically significant association between blood type A and CD4 and CD8 T lymphopenia was found. These results should be confirmed by studies based on larger patient samples.},
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Association Between ABO-RHD Blood Groups and COVID-19: A Preliminary Study of 76 Cases
    AU  - Adou Adjoumanvoule Honore
    AU  - Siransy Kouabla Liliane
    AU  - Memel Lasme Roselle Charline
    AU  - Yeboah Oppong Richard
    AU  - Goran-Kouacou Amah Patricia
    AU  - Kone Djakaridja
    AU  - Kadiane N’Dri Juliette
    AU  - Assi Aya Ursule Aniela
    AU  - Gnemagnon Mahi Eric Constant
    AU  - Ouattara Awa
    AU  - Oura Brou Doris
    AU  - Moussa Sali
    AU  - Koya Hebert Gautier
    AU  - Seri Yida Jocelyne
    AU  - Aba Yapo Thomas
    AU  - Krah Ouffoue
    Y1  - 2023/05/10
    PY  - 2023
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11
    DO  - 10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11
    T2  - International Journal of Immunology
    JF  - International Journal of Immunology
    JO  - International Journal of Immunology
    SP  - 1
    EP  - 5
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2329-1753
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.iji.20231101.11
    AB  - Introduction: Blood types are most often incriminated in susceptibility to COVID-19. Blood group O subjects are reportedly less susceptible to COVID-19. However, these reports are mainly from countries with high infection rates. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the association between the risk of COVID-19 infection, its severity, and ABO-RHD blood groups at the Training Hospitals of Bouake and Cocody (Ivory Coast). Material and methods: This was a prospective study that lasted four months. All patients with COVID-19 at the time of the study and followed at the Training Hospitals of Bouake and Cocody, hospitalized in the COVID-19 centers or in home confinement, were included. T lymphocyte subpopulations were counted on the BD FACS Calibur flow cytometer after labeling. ABO and RHD blood typing was performed in all patients. Results: Of the 76 patients collected, 78.9% were homebound, 18.4% in hospital and 2.6% in the ICU. The mean age was 41.92 ± 15.13 years with a male predominance. The majority of hospitalized patients were significantly of blood group A (p=0.020). CD4 and CD8 T lymphopenia were significantly more frequent in patients with blood group A than in those with blood groups B, AB and O. Conclusion: The impact of blood group on the severity of the disease would exist. Our study showed that blood group A subjects were more likely to have COVID-19. In addition, a statistically significant association between blood type A and CD4 and CD8 T lymphopenia was found. These results should be confirmed by studies based on larger patient samples.
    VL  - 11
    IS  - 1
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology Department, Training Hospital of Bouake, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, Training Hospital, Bouake, Ivory Coast

  • Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, Training Hospital, Bouake, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, Training Hospital, Bouake, Ivory Coast

  • Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, Training Hospital, Bouake, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology Department, Training Hospital of Bouake, Ivory Coast

  • Immunology-Allergology Department, Training Hospital of Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

  • Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, Training Hospital, Bouake, Ivory Coast

  • Infectious and Tropical Diseases Department, Training Hospital, Bouake, Ivory Coast

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